Archive for the ‘future’ Category

a taste of summer   29 comments

It seems that summer has arrived here in Round Hill. Nights are still quite cool, but days have been warm and this week threatens to be quite hot. I continue to work away at things here – both indoors and out. Instead of writing much in this post, I thought it would be fun to share some photos taken over the past week or so (click on all photos for larger views).

To begin, the above photo was taken down by the river. As you may recall, I have been cutting trails through the property and have cleared four access points to the shoreline. This is the one that I can see from my bedroom window. The photo was taken about three-quarters of the way down the hill. From my room, the chair looks quite tiny. Anyhow, there is now a steep but walkable trail from the house to the river. It’s a nice view. One of these days, when I actually take some time off work around here, I may actually go down and sit in that chair.

This photo is of a rusty cast iron tripod that I found while clearing trails back in the woods. As I work my way through the property, I constantly unearth objects. This is the largest as yet. Mostly, I find glass bottles, tin cans, metal pans, and occasionally reams of the most horrid looking “barbed tape” fence wire which I carefully remove and wind into hoops to be stowed in a safe place. The history of this property has something to do with the stuff that I unearth. Behind the old house, there was once a barn, and on the hillside down to the river, an old cooper’s shed where barrels were once made for shipping apples from this region. Down by the river, on a lot which is now severed from this property and owned by a neighbour, there were once two large factory buildings for the Round Hill Woodworks. Only one building remains. It was the general store for the village for many years, before eventually closing down and being sold off. In any case, with so much activity on this property, it is really no surprise that objects are unearthed almost everywhere I look. Kind of fascinating.

If you are on Facebook, you’ll already know that I spent last Sunday removing three large windows from the second floor level of the house. Last summer, I made an unsuccessful attempt to remove the rotten old storm windows from the upper level. I soon discovered that the windows were not only attached by the regular screw bolts, but that they had also been nailed to the sashes using huge common nails (ggrrrrhhhhh!!!!).

There was no way that I could get proper leverage to extract the nails while standing at the top of a ladder, so I decided to leave the job for the winter and figure out a different way to get the old windows off the house. This time, I tackled the job from the inside, first removing the inner windows which all need some repair work anyhow. Then, I used a crow bar to partially pry each window away from the sash. Once there was a crack of open space, I threaded some cord around each window and tied it to a nail I hammered up above the inside window frame. Then I finished prying the windows out, catching them as they swung out and down, but stopped from crashing to the ground by the cord. With the windows now out of the way, I can do some repairs to the sashes and the upper siding and finish painting the upper level exterior before summer’s end.

My modus operandi for working on this place is to tackle several jobs at a time. I know that probably bothers some of you. Why not start one job and just work at it until the very end? Well, that wouldn’t suit my personality too well. I like to have several irons in the fire at all times. There are practical reasons as well. Sometimes it is too hot to be working on the trail building project, or it’s been raining and the exterior walls are too saturated to paint, so I need an indoors job. That’s what the above and the next few photos are all about. As some of you may remember from last year’s work program, I repaired and painted the downstairs but stopped about half way up the staircase. Now I am carrying on into the upper level. The above photo is of the long room with two windows that look out onto the front garden (the same window openings featured in the photo further up this page). I like this room very much and intend to turn it into a studio at some point – maybe around the same time that I go down to sit in the chair by the river.

Anyhow, the condition of the walls in this room are not too terrible, other than at one end where the plaster is off the lath on the sloped ceiling, and there are planks that were covered with wallpaper which frames a rather spooky closet. The rest of the ceiling is peeling and requires scraping – all similar to the Room of the Scary Wallpaper which I worked on last summer.

There is a square tower room as well, and it is almost ready for painting. There are two more bedrooms and a long hall on the back side of the upper floor. They are in rather dreadful condition and will require *a lot* of work. I don’t think I will get to them this summer.

Anyhow, here is the same view of the *proposed studio* after most of the wallpaper has been scraped away and the first coat of plaster applied. It is already looking much nicer and brighter in the room and my imagination is busily creating visions of a nice studio with a work table, easel, cabinet for paints and brushes……… Well, I shall get there eventually.

Now, lest anyone think that I don’t take the odd day off, The above photo will prove you wrong. On Saturday mornings, I usually tear myself away from work for an hour or two to visit the Annapolis Royal farmers’ market. Generally, I buy a couple of soft pretzels and fruit turnovers, then poke around looking at everyone’s stuff. The above insulators were acquired over a couple of weekly visits to one of the vendor’s tables. At some point, I hope to build a little glass shelf upon which they will sit at the top of the now-absent windows of the partially-plastered studio room. Do you get how all of this works? It’s all about building up a series of carrots leading from one job to the next. Somewhere at the end of the string of carrots, there is a chair by the river and several colorful insulators displayed on a glass shelf.

Okay, I know what you are thinking. What on earth is this photo about? Well, this is a photo of the next major town north of here – as depicted on a postcard dated circa 1900. It is one of about two dozen neat old postcards in a scrapbook owned by my next door neighbour. In my *spare* time (what’s that?), I have been scanning the cards, along with an old post office register book that was kept by her uncle from 1894 to 1931. The point of this activity is to preserve these relics for posterity. Once I get a bit more *spare* time, I hope to contact the local historical society to find a safe, permanent home for the old postal register – where it might prove rather useful to genealogists and historians of this region. For those who are interested, I have put .jpegs of all the postcard scans in an online gallery here. Hope that link works.

Now, believe it or not, I do manage to remember to stop and eat occasionally. Of course, by the time that happens it is usually around 7 or 8 in the evening. A week or so ago, I decided it would be nice to cook the odd meal on a barbecue. Only one problem – no barbecue – as I gave the old one away when I sold the farm. However, I had noticed a small kettle type barbecue on sale at the local grocery store, so I stopped by and bought it, a bag of chunk charcoal, and a bunch of vegetables. The barbecue came -unassembled – in a large box weighing 25 pounds. At first, I thought to leave assembly until later in the afternoon – after all, the instructions said it would take just 10 to 15 minutes to assemble the unit. However, some rational part of my brain quickly deduced that there was no way that 25 pounds of barbecue parts were going to fit together and be ready to cook in 15 minutes. About 1 hour and 15 minutes later, the barbecue was ready for charcoal. The asparagus and the long strips of a sweet red banana peppers proved to be especially good.

Of course, no long, busy day of work would be quite complete without turning on the UV lamp and firing up the camera gear for an evening of mothing. Listening to Loons calling, Barred owls hooting, coyote howling, raccoons fighting over vegetable scraps back at the compost bin while you photograph moths can be so relaxing. With any luck, I get a few nice moths like the Pachysphinx modesta in the final photo. It’s a good way to wrap up the day before catching a few hours of sleep in preparation to start all over again in the morning.

Written by bev wigney on July 17th, 2011

CSP Mystery Ball – 2011   15 comments

Posted at 4:24 pm in Art,Bisbee,future

detail from Bisbeeland – an outdoor installation by Robert Bennett

As mentioned in my last post, for the past month, I’ve busy working on several art pieces destined for an installation at the Mystery Ball fundraiser for the Central School Project (Bisbee’s community center for the arts). The event was held on Saturday, February 5th, and has been declared a great success. Over 20 regional artists created visual, audio, multimedia and performance art installations on three levels of the CSP’s unique and historic building located in the center of old Bisbee.

view of MADEA installation by Joe Klinger and Danny Seltzer

All of the installations were wonderfully creative. One interesting aspect of almost every installation was that they were made from found objects and recycled materials. Although I can only feature a few of the works here, please visit the online gallery which I’ve created to display some of the photos that I and a couple of friends shot during the evening. Just click on any image to see its larger view, and the same goes for the photos in this blog post. I spent a good three hours wandering around all levels of the building, studying and photographing installations, and watching the multimedia and performance art productions. All were fascinating or entertaining in some way.

NoVOGRAFIAS: poembirth multimedia performance installation by Logan Phillips

One of my favourites of the evening was Logan Phillips’ multimedia performance installation, NoVOGRAFIAS: poembirth. It was visually intense and kept many watchers spellbound, standing crowded together peering through the doorway into a small room. I sat on some nearby theater seats and slipped over to shoot photos and a couple of video clips when there was a brief gap in the watchers. Here is a short video clip of the performance which went on almost non-stop for three hours (the clip is in .mp4 format). The other multimedia piece that held my attention for quite some time was the Digital Puppets Brought to Life by Natural Interactions – by the Circus of Tiny Invisibility. The installation featured a digital puppet theater consisting of a cloth projection sheet. Passersby could stand within a certain area in front of the screen and move about in ways which would cause clowns, acrobats and other digitally created puppets to move on the projection sheet. All of this is best seen rather than described, so I’ve put up a short video clip of one mystery ball attendee acting out in front of the screen while a clown figure responds on the screen. Of course, each person who came along had his or her own ideas about how they would like the puppet to behave, making for some rather hilarious innovations.

view of LIFE: the ultimate gamble installation by Jen & Judy Harris

My hat is off to all of the artists, and the many volunteers who were responsible for putting together a terrific evening of art and entertainment, and also to Melissa Holden, executive director of the CSP, who did such an able job of coordinating the event. Everything seemed to run so smoothly.

For my part, I enjoyed contributing as one of the installation artists (see below for a photo of attendees viewing some of the pieces and see the main photo gallery for more images). I realize that others may not realize the significance of my participation in this event, but I feel the need to take note. Since my husband, Don’s death, I have not had much interest in creating art. In fact, it has been almost impossible for me to produce much of anything, in spite of lugging a well-stocked sack of art supplies, brushes, pens and canvases, back and forth across North America through several crossings over the past two and a half years. However, something about putting together this installation finally motivated me to be creative and productive, at least for awhile. Here’s hoping that the momentum will continue.

Note: Here is a link to a gallery of images of my own Life’s Little Mysteries installation.

view of Life’s Little Mysteries installation by Bev Wigney

Written by bev wigney on February 9th, 2011